Afenyo-Markin, The Lawless Lawyer

Alexander Kwamena Afenyo-Markin

In an interview on Winneba based Radio Peace on Monday 22nd June, 2020, Afenyo-Markin asserted that some ‘students’ attempted gaining access to his house to beg for money, and that because these ‘students’ failed to have nose masks on, they were turned away.
So anyone who turns up at the house of Afenyo-Markin is a beggar? And this is an elected official? What does one expect from an outgoing Member of Parliament, anyway?

And Afenyo-Markin has no shame spewing this garbage on air? Where is the evidence that they were students?

Furthermore, if they were really students, where is the evidence that they were students of the University of Education, Winneba (UEW)?

Even if there is incontrovertible evidence that they were students, as a Member of Parliament (MP) who claim to have his constituents at heart, doesn’t it amount to hypocrisy of the highest order to turn constituents in need away?
What stopped Afenyo-Markin from providing these ‘student’ visitors to his house with nose masks before allowing them access to it?
This is what an Honourable MP was supposed to do. Anyway, what good does one expect from a dishonourable MP like Afenyo-Markin?

Even if the visitors in question were not students, Afenyo-Markin owed them a duty of care, and therefore, was duty bound to provide them with nose masks, by virtue of the fact that, he Afenyo-Markin is a public official, albeit, a failed Member of Parliament and disastrous Board Chairman of the Ghana Water Co. Ltd.

The ignoramus Afenyo-Markin then went on to appeal to the management of UEW to educate its students on the importance of putting on a nose mask in public. I challenge Afenyo-Markin to cite the relevant law that mandates UEW to educate the general public on the compulsory wearing of nose mask in public places.

Let me educate this failed MP a little. President Nana Akufo-Addo signed into law Executive Instrument 164 (E.I. 164), that criminalizes the act of not wearing a face mask that fully covers the mouth and nose in public places. Those who go contrary to the provisions of E. I. 164 on conviction, face a fine of up to GHS60,000 or a prison sentence of up to 10 years, or to both.

E. I. 164 empowers the Police to enforce its provisions, i.e. the wearing of nose mask in all public places.

The question which demands an urgent answer from Afenyo-Markin is, which section or part of E. I. 164 provides that UEW should educate the public on the wearing of nose masks?

I would have referred to Afenyo-Markin as a dumb-ass, but am restrained from doing so because of good counsel from respectable members of society to avoid insults in my write-ups.

Alhassan Salifu Bawah
(son of an upright peasant farmer)

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